Oracle AM-103 - History

Oracle AM-103 - History

Oracle
(AM-103: dp. 890; 1. 221'2"; b. 32'0"; dr. 10'9" (mean); s. 18.1 k.; cpl. 105; a. 1 3", 2 40mm., 8 20mm., 2 .30 cal. mg., 2 dct.; cl. Auk)

Oracle (AM-103) was laid down by General Engineering ~ Dry Dock Co., Alameda, Calif., 7 May 1942, launched 30 September 1942, sponsored by Mrs. Sadie L. Jones, and commissioned 14 May 1943, Lt. Comdr. William H. Putnam, USNR, in command.

Getting underway from Alameda 27 June, Oracle steamed to Adak, Alaska, to spend the next 5 months in towing, escort, patrol, salvage, and survey operations in the Aleutians area. She furnished munesweeping and antisubmarine screening support for the occupation of Kiska 15 to 22 August.

Departing Adak 1 December, Oracle arrived at Pearl Harbor the 10th. On her first operation in the central Pacific, the invasion of Majuro Atoll, Marshalls, 31 January to 3 February 1944, she swept landing channels and took soundings for chart preparation. Oracle then proceeded to Kwajalein, arriving the next day for antisubmarine patrol until the 14th.

On 15 February Oracle got underway in convoy for Eniwetok, arriving 2 days later to mark the channel for the landing craft assault that same day. She again patrolled against enemy submarines until she departed Eniwetok 12 April for Pearl Harbor.

Following training from 20 April until 29 May for the invasion of Saipan, Oracle returned to the Marshalls to join a task group off Eniwetok 14 June. The minesweeper arrived off Tanapag Harbor, Saipan, the next day for minesweeping and screening before moving on to Magicienne Bay. On 10 July Oracle rescued two Japanese on a makeshift raft off Sa~pan.

By the 24th the ship was off Tinian for the landings and mop-us operations to 4 August. She spent most of September patrolling off the southern Marianas before escorting Girage (IX-118) to Guam, arriving the 20th.

From 1 to 10 October Oracle was on emergency chemical smoke watch off Apra Harbor, Guam, to protect shipping from Japanese air attack. She continued service off Guam and in operations to Ulithi until proceeding to Okinawa. Patrolling there on 6 May she assisted in splashing three Japanese planes. On 14 May Oracle departed C.uam for the West Coast, via Pearl Harbor, arriving Seattle, Wash., 6 July.

Fighting stopped during overhaul. Oracle got underway for Pearl Harbor 29 August, arriving 5 September. Reporting to Sasebo, Japan, 5 November, she participated in the mine clearance of the Formosa Straits area, until 23 December when she reached Shanghai, China.

On 3 January 1946 Oracle departed Shanghai for Pearl Harbor, via Sasebo, arriving the 31st. The minesweeper steamed for home in the spring, arriving San Diego, Calif., to be decommissioned 29 May and enter the Pacific Reserve Fleet there. On 7 February 1955 Oracle was redesignated MSF-103.

On 1 December 1966 Oracle was struck from the Navy List. The fleet minesweeper was stripped and used as a target for the Pacific Fleet in the winter of 1967.


Oracle blev fastlagt af General Engineering & Dry Dock Company i Alameda, Californien , 7. maj 1942 lanceret 30. september 1942 sponsoreret af fru Sadie L. Jones og blev taget i brug 14. maj 1943, lt. comdr. William H. Putnam, USNR , kommandant.

Ved at komme i gang fra Alameda, Californien den 27. juni, dampede Oracle til Adak, Alaska , for at tilbringe de næste fem måneder på bugsering, eskorte, patrulje, redning og undersøgelsesoperationer i Aleutians- området. Hun leverede minesvind og antisubmarinscreeningsstøtte til besættelsen af Kiska 15. til 22. august.

Afgang Adak 1. december ankom Oracle til Pearl Harbor den 10.. Ved sin første operation i det centrale Stillehav , invasionen af Majuro Atoll , Marshalls , 31. januar til 3. februar 1944, fejede hun landingskanaler og tog lydafsnit til kortforberedelse. Oracle fortsatte derefter til Kwajalein og ankom næste dag til antisubmarinpatrulje indtil den 14. Den 15. februar kom Oracle i gang i konvoj til Eniwetok og ankom to dage senere for at markere kanalen for angreb på landingsfartøjet samme dag. Hun patruljerede igen mod fjendens ubåde, indtil hun forlod Eniwetok den 12. april til Pearl Harbor.

Efter træning fra den 20. april til den 29. maj for invasionen af Saipan , Oracle tilbage til Marshalls at deltage i en arbejdsgruppe fra Eniwetok den 14. juni. Minesvegeren ankom ved Tanapag Havn, Saipan, den næste dag til minesvind og screening, før de gik videre til Magicienne Bay . Den 10. juli reddede Oracle to japanske overlevende på en provisorisk flåde ved Saipan. Den 24. var skibet væk fra Tinian for landingerne og mop-up-operationer til 4. august. Hun tilbragte det meste af september med at patruljere mod de sydlige Marianas, før hun eskorterede tankskibet Giraffe (IX-118) til Guam , ankom den 20..

Fra 1. til 10. oktober var Oracle på nødsituation med kemisk røgvagt ved Apra Havn , Guam, for at beskytte skibsfarten mod japansk luftangreb. Hun fortsatte med at servicere fra Guam og i operationer til Ulithi, indtil hun fortsatte til Okinawa . Patruljerer der den 6. maj hjalp hun med at skyde ned tre japanske fly. Den 14. maj forlod Oracle Guam til USAs vestkyst via Pearl Harbor og ankom Seattle, Washington , den 6. juli. Kampene stoppede under eftersyn. Oracle kom i gang til Pearl Harbor den 29. august og ankom den 5. september. Rapportering til Sasebo , Japan , den 5. november, deltog hun i minerydningen i Formosa Straits- området, indtil den 23. december, da hun nåede Shanghai, Kina . Den 3. januar 1946 rejste Oracle Shanghai mod Pearl Harbor via Sasebo og ankom den 31.

Minevægten Oracle dampet hen til hjemmet i foråret 1946 og ankom San Diego, Californien , for at blive taget ud af drift den 29. maj og gå ind i Pacific Reserve Fleet der. Den 7. februar 1955 blev Oracle redesignet MSF – 103. Den 1. december 1966 blev Oracle slået fra søfartøjsregisteret . Flåden minesvejer blev strippet og brugt som mål for stillehavsflåden vinteren 1967.


Password history table tips

Question: I need to understand how Oracle remember previous passwords. What table does Oracle store the previous passwords in? Are the passwords encrypted? Do I need to protect this password history table?

Answer: The SYS.USER_HISTORY$ table only contains the 3DES password hashes for the users password history.

One can view the password change history by querying oracle's internal table SYS.USER_HISTORY$. Note this table gets updated only if the user is assigned a profile that has password reuse limit (i.e. PASSWORD_REUSE_TIME set not to UNLIMITED):

select
name,
password_date
from
sys.user$,
sys.user_history$
where
user$.user# = user_history$.user#

NAME PASSWORD_
—————————— ———–
SCOTT 31-JAN-08
SCOTT 11-JUN-08

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Answers

I think you can start with "v$active_session_history" view.This can give you the sql_id,machine,user_id etc details.

Anand.. wrote:
I think you can start with "v$active_session_history" view.This can give you the sql_id,machine,user_id etc details.

Access to this table is subjected to a "Diagnostics & Tuning"-pack license.
If you don't have the license you're not allowed to use that View

Anyway this view only contains information of the last couple of hours
It then is flushed into dba_hist_active_sess_history which contains data for several days, but not at detailed as the v$active_session_history


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Oracle AM-103 - History

AM-103
Displacement 890
Length 221'2"
Beam 32'
Draw 10'9"
Speed 18.1 k
Complement 105
Armament 1 3", 2 40mm, 8 20mm, 2 .30cal mg, 2 dct
Class Auk

Oracle (AM-103) was laid down by General Engineering & Dry Dock Co., Alameda, Calif., 7 May 1942, launched 30 September 1942, sponsored by Mrs. Sadie L. Jones, and commissioned 14 May 1943, Lt. Comdr. William H. Putnam, USNR, in command.

Getting underway from Alameda 27 June, Oracle steamed to Adak, Alaska, to spend the next 5 months in towing, escort, patrol, salvage, and survey operations in the Aleutians area. She furnished minesweeping and antisubmarine screening support for the occupation of Kiska 15 to 22 August.

Departing Adak 1 December, Oracle arrived at Pearl Harbor the 10th. On her first operation in the central Pacific, the invasion of Majuro Atoll, Marshalls, 31 January to 3 February 1944, she swept landing channels and took soundings for chart preparation. Oracle then proceeded to Kwajalein, arriving the next day for antisubmarine patrol until the 14th.

On 15 February Oracle got underway in convoy for Eniwetok, arriving 2 days later to mark the channel for the landing craft assault that same day. She again patrolled against enemy submarines until she departed Eniwetok 12 April for Pearl Harbor.

Following training from 20 April until 29 May for the invasion of Saipan, Oracle returned to the Marshalls to join a task group off Eniwetok 14 June. The minesweeper arrived off Tanapag Harbor, Saipan, the next day for minesweeping and screening before moving on to Magicienne Bay. On 10 July Oracle rescued two Japanese on a makeshift raft off Saipan.

By the 24th the ship was off Tinian for the landings and mop-us operations to 4 August. She spent most of September patrolling off the southern Marianas before escorting Girage (IX-118) to Guam, arriving the 20th.

From 1 to 10 October Oracle was on emergency chemical smoke watch off Apra Harbor, Guam, to protect shipping from Japanese air attack. She continued service off Guam and in operations to Ulithi until proceeding to Okinawa. Patrolling there on 6 May she assisted in splashing three Japanese planes. On 14 May Oracle departed Guam for the West Coast, via Pearl Harbor, arriving Seattle, Wash., 6 July.

Fighting stopped during overhaul. Oracle got underway for Pearl Harbor 29 August, arriving 5 September. Reporting to Sasebo, Japan, 5 November, she participated in the mine clearance of the Formosa Straits area, until 23 December when she reached Shanghai, China.

On 3 January 1946 Oracle departed Shanghai for Pearl Harbor, via Sasebo, arriving the 31st. The minesweeper steamed for home in the spring, arriving San Diego, Calif., to be decommissioned 29 May and enter the Pacific Reserve Fleet there. On 7 February 1955 Oracle was redesignated MSF-103.

On 1 December 1966 Oracle was struck from the Navy List. The fleet minesweeper was stripped and used as a target for the Pacific Fleet in the winter of 1967.


V$ACTIVE_SESSION_HISTORY

Samples of wait event information are taken once per second and made available using the V$ACTIVE_SESSION_HISTORY view. An active session is one that is waiting on CPU or any event that does not belong to the "Idle" wait class at the time of the sample. The sample information is written to a circular buffer in the SGA, so the greater the database activity, the less time the information will remain available for.

The V$ACTIVE_SESSION_HISTORY view is essentially a fact table, which can be linked to a number of dimensions to provide statistics specific to a variety of things including SQL statements, execution plans, objects, wait events, sessions, modules, actions, client identifiers, services and consumer groups etc. This makes it an incredibly flexible way of identifying what active sessions are doing, or have done. For example, if I wanted to see the main activity on the database for the last 5 minutes, I could use the following query.

Notice how the count of the samples is used to determine the time waited, not the WAIT_TIME or TIME_WAITED columns. Why is this done? Remember, this is sample data, so wait times are accumulating with each sample. Merely summing them will give a falsely high value. To explain this, imagine simplified case where a single session is waiting on "db file sequential read" for 5 seconds. That means we would have 5 samples, that may look like this.

We know the total wait time is 5 seconds. If we count the number of samples, we get 5, which we equate to 5 seconds. If we sum the time for all 5 samples get 15 seconds.

The time columns in the ASH data are a little more complicated than they first appear, so check the documentation when using them. Incorrect usage of these columns is probably the most common mistake people make when using ASH views.

The fact ASH uses samples can of course mean certain bits of information slip through the net, but this is not really a problem. The chances are your main concerns will be those sessions or statements that are taking lots of time. The longer things take to run, the more samples they are likely to be picked up in. It is unlikely that anything of major concern will completely fail to register in the ASH views, but that doesn't mean you can ignore its limitations.


Pan Am 103 Bombing

On December 21, 1988, on a cold and ultimately chilling evening just four days before Christmas, Pan Am Flight 103 took off from London’s Heathrow Airport bound for New York City. Among the 259 passengers and crew were 190 Americans.

They never made it home. Less than 40 minutes into the flight, the plane exploded over the sky above Lockerbie, Scotland, killing everyone on board and 11 Scots on the ground.

Until 9/11, it was one of the world’s most lethal acts of air terrorism and one of the largest and most complex acts of international terrorism ever investigated by the FBI.

Solving the case required unprecedented international cooperation—and hours upon hours of painstaking work. With the mid-air explosion 30,000 feet up, debris rained down over 845 square miles across Scotland. FBI agents and international investigators combed the countryside on hands and knees looking for clues in virtually every blade of grass, eventually turning up thousands of pieces of evidence. They also traversed the globe, interviewing more than 10,000 individuals in dozens of countries.

Participating in the investigation were an array of international police organizations from such countries as Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and, of course, Great Britain (including Scotland).

Ultimately, forensic specialists from the FBI, the CIA, and elsewhere determined that one of the fragments found on the ground, no bigger than a thumbnail, came from the circuit board of a radio/cassette player. That tiny piece of evidence helped establish that the bomb had been placed inside that radio and tape deck in a piece of luggage. Another small fragment, found embedded in a piece of shirt, helped identify the type of timer.

Devastation in Lockerbie following the bombing (AP Photo)

This evidence led to two Libyan intelligence operatives. In November 1991, the U.S. and Scotland simultaneously indicted the pair for planting the bomb. On January 31, 2001, after years of working to extradite the men and bring the case to trial, Abdel Basset Ali Al-Megrahi was found guilty of the crime. The co-defendant was found not guilty and released.

Recently, the Libyan government formally accepted responsibility for the bombing and has agreed to pay nearly $3 billion to the victims’ families.

Former FBI Director Robert Mueller, who headed up the investigation while Assistant Attorney General of the Criminal Division of the Department of Justice, described the impact the case had on him personally:

“The constables in charge of the Scottish end of the investigation had constructed a small wooden warehouse in which were stored the various effects of those who were on the plane when it broke apart in the skies: a white sneaker never again to be worn by the teenager a Syracuse sweatshirt never again to be worn by the Syracuse student, and other such everyday pieces of clothing and personal belongings. These ordinary items brought home to me, and came to symbolize for me, the pain and the loss felt by those whose family, friends, or colleagues died that evening.”


In Oracle 7, Oracle Education (later Oracle University) advocated ?instance tuning?, an approach whereby the database is tuned as a whole by optimizing the critical init.ora parameters, CBO statistics and object parameters. We also saw these specific tuning features:

Sequential prefetch for full table scans (asynchronous read ahead)

alter index xx rebuild syntax

Oracle7 was in the days when a 300 megabyte SGA was considered large, and DBA's tuned to very simple rules. The Oracle Education DBA tuning course recommended simple ratio-based tuning, and almost all Oracle databases were I/O-bound, largely due to tiny RAM buffers.


20 years after Pan Am 103 was blown up, could history repeat?

Twenty years ago Sunday, plastic explosives hidden inside a radio cassette player in a Samsonite suitcase ripped a hole in Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, killing 270 people, including 38 from New Jersey. Until 9/11, it was deadliest act of terrorism involving Americans.

The Lockerbie bombing was one of a number of disasters in which the world said "never again." But after three special commissions on aviation security, the 9/11 attacks, the shoe bomber and thwarted sports-drink bomb plot in the United Kingdom, could something as seemingly archaic as a suitcase bomb still destroy an airplane?

According to investigators, the bag was planted by two Libyan intelligence operatives, one of whom was also an airline worker at a small airport in Malta, an island between Tunisia and the toe of Italy's boot. The bag passed through airports in Frankfurt and London with little scrutiny even though the passenger who checked it never boarded the flights.

Things have changed. Airlines are now required to match all bags with passengers. Luggage is screened for explosives using high-tech machines that work like CAT scans. And the number of closed-circuit television cameras in the restricted areas of airports has multiplied to prevent inside jobs.


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